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Early intervention is always better than crisis management - but it is never too late to do the right thing.

The mistake that Sharon and I both made is we never set any boundaries.  (Ozzy Osbourne)

When a child is disregulated - is the time parents need to be regulated.

Criticism is not a motivator.

A tantruming toddler is a little ball of writhing muscle and incredible strength. It's like trying to carry a greased pig past a slop bucket.

"The thing that impresses me most about North America is the way parents obey their children"    (King Edward VII , 1841-1910)

Many clinicians find it easier to tell parents their child has a brain-based disorder than suggest parenting changes. Jennifer Harris (psychiatrist)

Children do not develop on their own - they only develop within relationships.

There has been an explosion in the prescribing of medication for very young children, particularly preschool and kindergarten boys (Juli Zito , Univ. of Maryland)

The best inheritance  parents can give their children is a few minutes of their time each day.

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Brain Facts # 4

The Changing Brain

 

Our brains constantly change over our lifetime as we develop and age. As a consequence, the way various brain functions work also changes, sometimes for better and sometimes for worse.

The brain of a newborn is far from developed; it needs time to fully grow and establish connections on both large and small scales. Our brain’s functions improve drastically throughout childhood and adolescence, following a generally predictably progression. It is only in our mid 20’s that we finally possess a fully-equipped brain, complete with a well-developed prefrontal cortex to help each of us succeed in leading an independent life as an adult.

Even after the brain is fully formed in young adulthood, researchers have found the functions that benefit from accumulated experience, such as vocabulary-related language skills, pattern recognition and emotional self-regulation, tend to improve decade after decade.

On the other hand, starting in our late 20’s and early 30’s, the research shows that speed of processing and working memory tend (on average) to slow down, reducing our capacity to process and deal with complex new information. This is a gradual process that often first  becomes noticeable in our early 40’s. Of course, individuals vary significantly in how and when they experience this decline: some people experience a significant decline while others do not.

In short, “old dogs” can certainly learn – faster than “young dogs” in domains that benefit from accumulated experience, and slower in domains that change too rapidly for accumulated experience to accrue a significant benefit.

CLASSROOM & HOMEWORK TIPS for SPECIAL LEARNERS

Until recently doctors were limited in evaluating problems in a brain because they did not have the diagnostic tools needed. Standard MRI and CAT scans were able to view brain anatomy but they cannot provide information about how well the brain is working. EEGs give a measure of the electrical activity in the brain but provides limited information about the deeper structures in the brain. More modern diagnostic scanning equipment (e.g.. SPECT, fMRI and PET) can give actual images of how a brain is working and can be of great value in evaluating, diagnosing and managing treatment and the educational needs of special needs children.

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Workshops

+ Behaviour Management

This full day or 2 evening workshop will introduce you […]

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+ Lick Your Kids

  “Lick Your Kids” (figuratively not literally) (2 hours) First […]

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+ A Parent’s Guide to the Teenage Brain

  A teenager’s brain is not just an adult brain […]

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+ Reading Rescue

A program for children with reading problems

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+ Taming a Toddler

Many parents wonder what hit them when their sweet little baby turns into an unreasonable toddler – ideas for dealing with mealtime, bedtime, temper tanturms, toilet training, noncompliance, etc.

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See more of our workshops


Contact

2720 Rath Street, Putnam, Ontario
NOL 2BO

Phone: (519) 485-4678
Fax: (519) 485-0281

Email: info@rickharper.ca

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Parents' Comments

“Implementing Rick’s techniques and adhering to them is exhausting, but it is a healthy exhaustion rather than the detrimental exhaustion I used to experience.”

(B.F. – Woodstock)