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Relationships matter:  change comes through forming trusting relationships. People, not programs change people.

The best inheritance  parents can give their children is a few minutes of their time each day.

Adolescence can be the cruelest place on earth. It can really be heartless.  ( Tori Amos)

Many clinicians find it easier to tell parents their child has a brain-based disorder than suggest parenting changes. Jennifer Harris (psychiatrist)

Simple rules adhered to when children are young can prevent more serious problems later.

"Rules without relationship leads to rebellion" (Josh McDowell)

If you are headed in the wrong direction as a parent - you are allowed to make a U-turn.

It is what we say and do when we're angry that creates the very model our children will follow when dealing with their own frustrations.

Whining and crying are employed by kids for the purpose of getting something. If it works, then it was worth the effort and will be repeated.

If you (parents) tend to overreact to your child's misbehaviour - your child learns that he can't trust you. Mom, Dad, stay regulated!

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What Does Depression in Young People Look Like?

The following is an excerpt from a book by Carol Fitzpatrick and John Sharry. Case Study: “Debbie, aged 13, has not been to school for 8 weeks. She got the flu 3 months ago and was out of school for a week. She was determined to get back as quickly as possible as she is a conscientious student who works very hard and who likes to be and expects to be at the top of […]

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Myths vs Facts – Suicide

MYTH VERSUS FACT Knowing truth from fiction can make the difference! Myth: Teens who talk about suicide never do. Fact: Most of the time, people who attempt suicide have   provided significant clues to their intentions.   Myth: Nothing can stop someone once he has decided  to take his own life. Fact: Most adolescents who contemplate suicide are torn. They are in pain and want their suffering to end.  They don’t necessarily want to die […]

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Recommendations for Parents of Children with ADD/ADHD

Insist upon a proper evaluation – one that takes account of all aspects of your child’s life – medical social academic psychological Consider ALL avenues of treatment – academic, psychosocial medical alternative Do not feel guilty about using medication if you feel confident in the medical evaluation and the advice you have received Do not be intimidated by “political correctness” Consider life style choices – social, economic Know your educational rights

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Recommendations for schools regarding children with ADD/ADHD

Whenever possible, special needs children will do better within regular classrooms Putting more adults in a classroom (ie. EA’s, volunteers, etc.) is good for all children, but especially those who need more immediate feedback and attention. Traditionally arranged classroom furniture can provide more structure than the “open” concept. Establish, destigmatize and encourage the use of quiet spaces in the classroom Standards must be tailored to individual children’s capabilities ADHD/ADD children generally do better with a […]

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Workshops

+ Behaviour Management (now available online)

This full day or 2 evening workshop will introduce you […]

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+ Lick Your Kids

  “Lick Your Kids” (figuratively not literally) (2 hours) First […]

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+ A Parent’s Guide to the Teenage Brain

  A teenager’s brain is not just an adult brain […]

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+ Reading Rescue

A program for children with reading problems

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+ Taming a Toddler

Many parents wonder what hit them when their sweet little baby turns into an unreasonable toddler – ideas for dealing with mealtime, bedtime, temper tanturms, toilet training, noncompliance, etc.

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See more of our workshops


Contact

2720 Rath Street, Putnam, Ontario
NOL 2BO

Phone: (519) 485-4678
Fax: (519) 485-0281

Email: info@rickharper.ca

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Parents' Comments

“Our daughter was the joy of our life until she turned 13, then all hell broke loose. Rick helped us understand what was happening to her and we made some adjustments that helped us get through it. She’s now in University and doing well.”

(D.A. – St. Thomas)