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"Cutting" is a visible sign to the world that you are hurting.

Parenting style matters - a lot!

If there is no relationship - nothing else matters !

"To be a man, a boy must see a man."  (J.R. Moehringer)

If you (parents) tend to overreact to your child's misbehaviour - your child learns that he can't trust you. Mom, Dad, stay regulated!

Setting limits teaches your children valuable skills they will use the rest of their lives. One day, they will report to a job where their ability to follow rules will dictate their success.

Children today are under enormous pressures rarely experienced by their parents or grandparents. Many of today's children are being enticed to grow up too quickly and are encountering challenges for which they are totally unprepared.

The best inheritance  parents can give their children is a few minutes of their time each day.

Some hope their children will be like sponges soaking up the truth and wisdom imparted by their parents. However appealing this philosophy might be, it seldom seems to catch on with their children.

"Unexpressed feeling never die. They are buried alive and come back later in ugly ways." (Stephen Covey)

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Politics of Teaching Reading

 

 

Proponents of each of the 2 approaches to reading (phonics based vs whole language) maintain their approach is the “KEY” to engaging children in reading and are often critical of the other. The “whole language” group think children’s literature, writing activities and communication activities can be used across the curriculum to teach reading. The backers of “phonics” instruction insist that a direct, sequential mode of teaching reading enables students to master reading in an organized way. The debate over which system is best isn’t new. In fact the question has been argued through much of the 20th century with the pendulum regularly swinging back and forth.

Which is best?

It depends:

– some children tend to be visual learners and are more likely to benefit from the whole language approach since their strength is in recognizing words and word sequences that they have seen before. They tend to enjoy and learn from the popular literature and the peer interactions prominent in this approach.

– some children tend to be auditory learners and they learn best by what they hear so they rely more on the systematic approach of phonics.

The majority of experts now contend that neither approach by itself is effective all of the time but that both approaches possess merit. What does succeed most of the time is a carefully designed reading program that employs part whole language and part phonics and takes into account each students learning style, strengths and weaknesses.

In recent years the school system in Ontario has increased emphasis on the whole language approach and most children are experiencing success in the development of their reading skills. There are however a significant number of children where this is not the case. For some reason(s) the whole language approach is not working for them and they are falling behind their classmates in this essential skill. Unfortunate biproducts of this failure to learn reading frequently show up as:

  • behaviour problems
  • school refusal

My next posting will explain how “Reading Rescue” is addressing the problem.

  • low self esteem
  • homework problems
  • psychosomatic health problems
  • etc.

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Workshops

+ Behaviour Management

This full day or 2 evening workshop will introduce you […]

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+ Lick Your Kids

  “Lick Your Kids” (figuratively not literally) (2 hours) First […]

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+ A Parent’s Guide to the Teenage Brain

  A teenager’s brain is not just an adult brain […]

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+ Reading Rescue

A program for children with reading problems

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+ Taming a Toddler

Many parents wonder what hit them when their sweet little baby turns into an unreasonable toddler – ideas for dealing with mealtime, bedtime, temper tanturms, toilet training, noncompliance, etc.

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See more of our workshops


Contact

2720 Rath Street, Putnam, Ontario
NOL 2BO

Phone: (519) 485-4678
Fax: (519) 485-0281

Email: info@rickharper.ca

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Parents' Comments

“We were so naive. We thought our son’s poor behaviour was just a phase he was passing through. Thankfully you led us ‘out of the wilderness'”

(N.S. – London)