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Children fare better when expectations on them are clear and firm.

Don't wait for him to turn 10 before you reveal that you are not in fact the hired help whose job it is to clean up after him.

"Rules without relationship leads to rebellion" (Josh McDowell)

"Unexpressed feeling never die. They are buried alive and come back later in ugly ways." (Stephen Covey)

The quickest way to change your child’s behaviour is to first change your own.

The challenge of adolescence is to balance the right of the parents to feel they are in charge with the need of the adolescent to gain independence.

Whining and crying are employed by kids for the purpose of getting something. If it works, then it was worth the effort and will be repeated.

Some hope their children will be like sponges soaking up the truth and wisdom imparted by their parents. However appealing this philosophy might be, it seldom seems to catch on with their children.

Children mimic well. They catch what they see better than they follow what they hear.

The way we talk to our children becomes their inner voice. (Peggy O'Mara)

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Brain Fact # 13

Food for Thought

 

If you were to inject a blue dye into the blood stream of an animal, tissues of the whole body would turn blue – except the brain and the spinal cord. This is due to the presence of the blood brain barrier which prevents some materials in the blood, such as bacteria, from entering the brain. The blood brain barrier works to maintain a constant environment for the brain while allowing the movement of essential molecules into it.

Two essential molecules that are allowed into the brain are oxygen and glucose. The brain’s energy requirements are far out of proportion to the 2% of the body’s total weight that it represents. The brain receives 15% of the cardiac output, and consumes 20% of total oxygen and nearly 20% of total glucose utilization. This means that  the brain extracts approximately 50% of  the oxygen and 10% of the glucose from the arterial blood. These are incredible number considering the small size of the brain.

Glucose, a form of sugar, is the brain’s source of fuel. Because brain cells cannot store glucose, they depend on the bloodstream to deliver it. Glucose in the blood comes mostly from carbohydrates, that is the starches and sugars that we ingest in the form of grains, fruits and vegetables and  dairy products. These complex carbohydrates are broken down slowly and delivered to the brain. Simple carbohydrates (most processed and sugary foods) break apart quickly and are rapidly released into the bloodstream and they rapidly raise your blood sugar level and give you a quick brain boost. The effect is short-lived however, because the hormone insulin signals cells to pull the excess glucose from the bloodstream and store it for later use. Neurons are unable to store glucose however and so they quickly deplete their fuel.

Our brains need glucose to function and there are different ways to get it with some foods (mostly natural ones) providing a better, slower and more constant source of fuel than others (processed and high sugar foods). This has important implications for brain performance as eating a healthy diet is an important factor in brain functioning.

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Workshops

+ Behaviour Management

This full day or 2 evening workshop will introduce you […]

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+ Lick Your Kids

  “Lick Your Kids” (figuratively not literally) (2 hours) First […]

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+ A Parent’s Guide to the Teenage Brain

  A teenager’s brain is not just an adult brain […]

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+ Reading Rescue

A program for children with reading problems

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+ Taming a Toddler

Many parents wonder what hit them when their sweet little baby turns into an unreasonable toddler – ideas for dealing with mealtime, bedtime, temper tanturms, toilet training, noncompliance, etc.

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2720 Rath Street, Putnam, Ontario
NOL 2BO

Phone: (519) 485-4678
Fax: (519) 485-0281

Email: info@rickharper.ca

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